Contact Bug. . .

All aspects of contact printing.

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JB Harlin
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Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:22 pm

Contact Bug. . .

Post by JB Harlin » Wed Feb 03, 2016 12:56 pm

I have been doing nothing but contact printing for about the last 8 years. . . ever since I starting using an 8x10 for my main camera. I also do some 11x14 and it looks like I will be dragging the 16x20 out again. Not sure if I remember how to use an enlarger. Anyone else bitten by the Contact Bug?

RichKlein
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Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:15 am

Contact Bug. . .

Post by RichKlein » Wed Feb 03, 2016 4:10 pm

Not yet, but I'd like to be! Please do share your knowledge.

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JB Harlin
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Contact Bug. . .

Post by JB Harlin » Wed Feb 03, 2016 8:04 pm

RichKlein wrote: Not yet, but I'd like to be! Please do share your knowledge.


Contact printing isn't difficult. . . in fact, it is quite easy. If you print on graded paper all you need is a printing frame or sheet of glass and a bare lamp. Little more complex using VC papers but definitely doable. We use an enlarger for VC papers. I mostly contact print 8x10 and 11x14. My wife contact prints 8x20 and enlarges 4x10.



Rather than go on here, take a look at this BLOG post, though mostly about printing on AZO it shows the setup we use. . .



http://jbhphoto.com/blog/2012/05/15/con ... nting-azo/

nikontim
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Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:09 pm

Contact Bug. . .

Post by nikontim » Thu Feb 04, 2016 6:20 am

looking forward to so 8x10 contact printing, I'll be shooting 8x10 VC paper as my negative material and prints . . . so I'll be watching this JB

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JB Harlin
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Contact Bug. . .

Post by JB Harlin » Thu Feb 04, 2016 7:17 am

nikontim wrote: looking forward to so 8x10 contact printing, I'll be shooting 8x10 VC paper as my negative material and prints . . . so I'll be watching this JB


Personally I have never made paper negatives, but I have seen some beautiful images that others have done. The paper is very slow, so you will be dealing with very long exposures. Also be sure to follow the Paper Negative area on this site.





Good luck! Hope to see some of your photos!

robert.frase
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Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2016 8:06 pm

Contact Bug. . .

Post by robert.frase » Sun Feb 14, 2016 8:35 pm

Just recently, I have been seriously considering starting with Contact Printing. Currently reviewing some Contact Print Frames - B&H and Bostick & Sullivan as I do not have the ability to make my own. In a week or so, I'll make my decision.

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sanchell
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Location: Oregon
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Contact Bug. . .

Post by sanchell » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:18 am

I have no experience with Bostick contact frames, but I do know they are respected for their quality. Online I see their locking mechanism is a traditional design, which I find easy to use.



I have several frames from the Formulary, the brand that B+H carries. They are well made and secure. The problem I have with Formulary frames is that the 4 clips that lock the frame down snap into place like little mousetraps. I have caught my finger under them more than once.
Do it in the Dark,



Steve Anchell

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JB Harlin
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Contact Bug. . .

Post by JB Harlin » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:45 am

Hi Robert. . . great to see you on here! What size frame are you looking for? Personally, I have never owned a new printing frame. The ones I have are all very old. They don't get used much, since we use a vacuum frame most of the time. Wish I could be of more help. Steve has more experience with the new frames than I do so you might look into his recommendations.

robert.frase
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Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2016 8:06 pm

Contact Bug. . .

Post by robert.frase » Sun Feb 21, 2016 4:03 pm

Thanks everyone. I thought about getting a contact frame for my 8x10 film since I don't have an enlarger for that size.

Jill Enfield
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Joined: Tue Feb 02, 2016 9:31 am

Contact Bug. . .

Post by Jill Enfield » Tue Feb 23, 2016 7:40 pm

Hi! The Bostick and Sullivan frames are beautiful made and built to last. Steve is correct about the Formulary contact frames - they are painful to use! Freestyle also has a nice contact frame. You can look here:

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/search?q=contact+frames

I am not sure if they have more than the one size, but you can call and ask.

tim meisburger
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Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 10:31 pm

Contact Bug. . .

Post by tim meisburger » Wed Mar 02, 2016 10:45 pm

Hello all. My first post here (you will normally find me at LFPF). I have been shooting a little 8x10 recently and making contact prints and cyanotypes, and found I wanted something a little better than the sheet of glass I had used when I (rarely) made contacts, so I made a printing frame and documented the process here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj2PgRVMahI



Its pretty simple and cheap, if you don't want to buy one already made. Its easiest with a table saw, but could be done almost as easily with hand tools.

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JB Harlin
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Contact Bug. . .

Post by JB Harlin » Thu Mar 03, 2016 8:01 am

tim meisburger wrote: Hello all. My first post here (you will normally find me at LFPF). I have been shooting a little 8x10 recently and making contact prints and cyanotypes, and found I wanted something a little better than the sheet of glass I had used when I (rarely) made contacts, so I made a printing frame and documented the process here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj2PgRVMahI



Its pretty simple and cheap, if you don't want to buy one already made. Its easiest with a table saw, but could be done almost as easily with hand tools.


Good one Tim! I am a DIY-type myself, though I have never built a printing frame. Over the years I picked up several vintage frames that are mostly older than me and did a rebuild on them. Building your own is not that difficult if you are handy at woodworking and have a few tools. (Red Green says, "If the women don't find you handy, they should at least find you handsome." Well. . . maybe I can fulfill the former???)



Most of the old frames have the hinged back covered with felt and will need to be replaced. You can use either new felt or rubber. The hardest part is getting the old material and glue off and will require some elbow grease. The hinged back is usually split 1/3 by 2/3 so you can open the short side and check the exposure progress when using POP or alternative processes.



The only thing I would add is, if you build your own frame, be sure to take some sandpaper and round all of the edges. Your hands will thank you. . . sharp edges and splinters are no fun in the darkroom!



Again, great video Tim. . . a printing frame is much better than only using a sheet of glass.

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