D-23 Divided

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Omar.Morales
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D-23 Divided

Post by Omar.Morales » Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:28 am

Hello to Everybody,

I have “discovered” D-23 Divided one year ago obtaining good results either with Tri-x or HP5+ EI 400 ASA. The process with the D-23 Divided is "3min + 3min”.

For me is an “automatic” developer, which is: you can develop loading with PAN F+ or Rollei supermax or Tri-X or HP5+ or ect. providing good results with ASA declared in the roll.

My question is:
* can I develop Tri-X or HP5+ with EI 800 ASA or EI 1600 ASA?

Thank you,
Omar Morales.-
Omar Morales.-

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sanchell
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Re: D-23 Divided

Post by sanchell » Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:30 pm

Divided development is not usually used for pushing film.

Film has a real speed that is engineered at the time of manufacture and it is very difficult to realize an actual speed increase through development, as measured by a measurable increase in shadow density.

Though we speak of "pushing" as an increase in film speed it is not. Pushing, e.g., setting the ISO higher to make exposure times faster in low light, and then overdeveloping, IS NOT A TRUE SPEED INCREASE. It is underexposure and overdevelopment, leading to thin shadows and dense highlights.

In order to get the photo we accept this as part of the image's mood: Deep, brooding shadows, blown highlights.

So, divided development, a procedure that when properly formulated develops to completion and stops, as does stand development, will do no more than produce the films native speed, whatever that may be.

To push film and achieve good results you need to use something like D-76, Ilford DD-X, or Kodak XTOL.

Now that I've said that, try pushing your films with Divided D-23 and let us know the results. ;)
Do it in the Dark,



Steve Anchell

Omar.Morales
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:36 am
Location: Montevideo / Florence

Re: D-23 Divided

Post by Omar.Morales » Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:47 am

Hello Mr.anchell,

I could prepare myself the D-76. Which are the dilution miming the D23 Divided?

By the way: Mytol it is good to push? And which are the dilution?

Probably I could do the comparison about D23 Divided / D-76 / Mytol.

Thank you,
Omar Morales.-
Omar Morales.-

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sanchell
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Re: D-23 Divided

Post by sanchell » Sat Nov 04, 2017 5:06 pm

Omar.Morales wrote:
Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:47 am
I could prepare myself the D-76. Which are the dilution miming the D23 Divided?
Are you asking about Divided D-76? If so, the formula is at the bottom of this reply. However, divided development, as I mentioned, is generally not meant for pushing film.
Omar.Morales wrote:
Fri Nov 03, 2017 4:47 am
By the way: Mytol it is good to push? And which are the dilution?
Though I have not tried it Mytol should be a very good formula for pushing film. The dilutions should be the same as those published for XTOL.

D-76H Divided Developer
(David Vestal)

Solution A
Water at 110F/43C, 750.0 ml
Metol, 3.0 g
Sodium sulfite, 50.0 g
Water to make 1.0 liter

Solution B
Water at 110F/43C, 750.0 ml
Borax, 5.0 g
Sodium sulfite, 50.0 g
Water to make 1.0 liter

Recommended Development Times:
Solution A – 3 minutes
Solution B – 3 to 5 minutes

Agitate continuously in Solution A for the first 60 seconds, then for 5 seconds every 30 seconds thereafter. Agitate continuously in Solution B. Alternately, agitate continuously in both solutions. After development, the film should be fixed and washed in the usual manner.
Do it in the Dark,



Steve Anchell

Omar.Morales
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:36 am
Location: Montevideo / Florence

Re: D-23 Divided

Post by Omar.Morales » Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:29 am

I beg your pardon; I made a mistake: I need the dilution for the D-76 at EI 800/1600 but I am deriving to other developer and I would like to close this topic. In case, I would start a topic about the D-76.

Anyway, thanks for the DD-23 update news, but I knew that Microphone if for pushing films and I not an expert with this developer, though I need to experiment.

Thanks again,
Omar Morales.-
Omar Morales.-

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John_In_Phoenix
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Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Re: D-23 Divided

Post by John_In_Phoenix » Mon Jan 01, 2018 3:40 pm

Recently I have been experimenting with Divided D-23 and find myself drawn more to it than some of my other long-time choices for some of my images.I have noticed the increase in fog noted in The Darkroom Cookbook. I do have Potassium Bromide on hand and can try it as a fog preventer in the first bath. My question is why the choice of this chemical over Benzotriazole? I already have a .2% bottle of it sitting on the shelf and wondered if it could be used instead of the Potassium Bromide to reduce fog?-Thanks

This image was shot on 12/29/17 using Divided D-23 as the developer for Fomapan 100 4X5 at box speed.-Happy New Year
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sanchell
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Re: D-23 Divided

Post by sanchell » Mon Jan 01, 2018 5:37 pm

BZT is most commonly used to reduce fog in high pH developers that contain Phenidone. That said, I can think of no practical reason not to at least try it in a test batch. It's action will be greater than that of bromide. Normally you would start with 1/10 the solution concentration of bromide, but Divided D-23 doesn't use bromide so try starting with 1 ml of a .2% solution of BZT. If you don't see noticeable improvement increase to 2 ml, then 4 ml, etc., but I doubt you will be able to use more than 2 ml before your highlights become gray.

That said, if you like using Divided D-23 I would highly suggest you try one of the variations found on page 84 of the first edition of The Film Developing Cookbook. For increased sharpness and a reduction of fog try the Dalzell variation:

A
Metol, 5 g
Sodium sulfite, anhy., 75 g
Water to make 1 liter

B
Borax, 10 g
Water to make 1 liter
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John_In_Phoenix
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Re: D-23 Divided

Post by John_In_Phoenix » Mon Jan 01, 2018 7:40 pm

Thanks Steve. I'll give it a try. Would the developing time for the Dalzell Variation be about the same ~3+3? I did try a variation stated as TD-201 in The Film Developing Cookbook but was not as impressed.

I read in The Film Developing Cookbook about adding Sodium Chloride to D-23. Do you have any additional thoughts about doing so? I read somewhere (Large Format Forum perhaps?) that D-23 + Sodium Chloride is essentially Ilford's Perceptol. Don't know if that is valid though. Perceptol is one of the few commercial developers I occasionally buy and like it for some images.

Love the 4th edition BTW. This image was developed in TD-201-Fomapan 100 4x5 at Box Speed exposed for shadows The original scanned image was fairly flat. Slight tone added in digital post via lightroom
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sanchell
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Re: D-23 Divided

Post by sanchell » Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:47 pm

John_In_Phoenix wrote:
Mon Jan 01, 2018 7:40 pm
I read in The Film Developing Cookbook about adding Sodium Chloride to D-23. Do you have any additional thoughts about doing so? I read somewhere (Large Format Forum perhaps?) that D-23 + Sodium Chloride is essentially Ilford's Perceptol. Don't know if that is valid though. Perceptol is one of the few commercial developers I occasionally buy and like it for some images.
That was from Bill Troop. Bill is not prone to making things up. As far as being the same as Perceptol, if you try it and get the same results as Perceptol, then it's probably Perceptol. What's that saying? If it looks like Perceptol, walks like Perceptol, and quacks like Perceptol it's probably a duck.
Do it in the Dark,



Steve Anchell

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